Public Accountability Report Public Accountability Report

Illinois Law Enforcement Training and Standards Board
(Appropriated Spending in Thousands)
  FY 2021 FY 2020
Reporting Programs Expenditures Headcount Expenditures Headcount
Law Enforcement Training $ 18,660.6 20.0 $ 19,690.6 21.0
Totals $ 18,660.6 20.0 $ 19,690.6 21.0

Amounts may not sum to total due to rounding.

Agency Narrative

The Illinois Police Training Act created the Board in 1965.  As subsequently amended, the Act charges the Board with the responsibility of maintaining and enhancing the level of local law enforcement and related support personnel training. 

 

Through various programs, the Board fulfills this mandate.  Maintenance is accomplished through the Board’s statutorily mandated law enforcement and county corrections training program.  Enhancement is accomplished through the Board’s in-service training delivery system. 

The Board is reporting its fiscal year 2021 service and efforts accomplishments for its main program – Law Enforcement Training.  This program has three main components: (1) mandated law enforcement officers basic training; (2) mandated county corrections officers basic training; and (3) in-service training delivery for public safety personnel. 

Mandated Law enforcement Officer Basic Training Outcome Indicators:  The Act requires the Board to reimburse eligible academy expenses (tuition, lodging, training materials) for each claimant in an amount established annually for each academy.  However, should either the appropriation or the fund balance be insufficient, the Act requires the Board to pro-rate eligible expenses to the available amount. 

In fiscal year 2021, the Board was able to fully reimburse these expenses at 100 percent of the statutorily maximum amount.    

Output indicators:  This represents the number of local law enforcement officer who completed the mandated training and whose department was eligible for reimbursement of approved expenses.  This number does not include officers who completed training but are not eligible for reimbursement (such as certain state and federal agencies, private colleges and railroads). 

Input Indicators:  The amount of funding allocated by the Board was almost $5.7 million. 

Efficiency/Cost-Effectiveness:  To the extent that the Board can minimize the average reimbursement cost for each law enforcement officer trained, this frees up resources for the in-service training delivery system and other uses. 

The goal is to keep these costs, over time, to a rate of increase in line with the general costs.  Note that this average is for seven academies whose costs range from $2,386 to $6,274.  It is for that reason that the Board looks at costs over time rather than from year to year.  Starting in fiscal year 2013, individual academy tuitions were set by the Board using a methodology that will determine an academy’s projected costs. 

Mandated County Corrections Officers Basic Training Outcome Indicators:  The Act requires the Board to reimburse eligible academy expenses (tuition, lodging, training materials) for each claimant in an amount established annually for each academy.  However, should either the appropriation or the fund balance be insufficient, the Act requires the Board to pro-rate eligible expenses to the available amount.  In fiscal year 2021, the Board was able to fully reimburse these expenses at 100 percent of the statutorily maximum amount. 

Output Indicators:  This represents the number of county corrections officers who completed the Mandated training and whose department was eligible for reimbursement of approved expenses.  This number does not include officers who completed training but are not eligible for reimbursement. 

Input Indicators:  The amount of funding allocated by the Board was $607,900.

Efficiency/Cost-Effectiveness:  To the extent that the Board can minimize the average reimbursement cost for each county corrections officer trained, this frees up resources for the in-service training delivery system and other uses.  The goal is to keep these costs, over time, to a rate of increase in line with the increase in general costs.  Note that this average is for five academies whose cost range from $680 to $4,258.  It is for that reason that the Board looks at costs over time rather than from year to year. 

In-Service Training Delivery for Public Safety personnel: The Act also requires the Board to approve and conduct several in-service training courses for certified officers. These courses must address specific subject areas and topics that officers must complete within one and three year periods. The Board may allocate training funds to local delivery affiliates depending on need and availability.

Output Indicators:  This represents the number of public safety personnel (law enforcement officers, county corrections officers, and support personnel) trained, as well as the total number of instructional hours conducted through approved trainings throughout the year.  

Input Indicators:  The amount of funding allocated by the Board was $5.9 million.  Note that since the Illinois Police Training Act requires funds first be made available for mandated costs (law enforcement and county corrections), that amount is often determined half-way into the fiscal year rather than at the beginning.  Reduced planning time can affect the efficiency/cost-effectiveness of this program. 

Efficiency/Cost-Effectiveness:  The in-service training delivery system operates statewide.  To the extent that administrative costs can be reduced or eliminated, more funds become available for training.  The cost per training man-hour is used.

In addition to the Board’s general training duties, The General Assembly passed he SAFE-T Act in January of 2021, which contains several significant statutory revisions to the Police Training Act and will add additional duties and procedures to the Board’s operations. Going forward, the Board will be more involved in the certification and decertification of all officers and will exercise greater authority over issues of training compliance. Throughout fiscal year 2022, several transitional steps are being taken to raise staffing levels, update administrative rules, and establish polices in accordance with these revised charges. While these actions have not resulted in significant financial obligations at this time, it is anticipated that the Board’s operational expenses will increase before the close of fiscal year 2022.

 

 

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